Episode 6 – AI Forensics and Pharaoh Hounds

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-t73d8-ac0f38

AI / Machine Learning pioneer Andre Magni visits the pod to talk computer intelligence; from Microsoft’s AI mission (to amplify human ingenuity with intelligent technology) to data-curation gotchas and modelling pitfalls to identifying dead bodies using AI.  We even talks about our “AI Moms” and Andre’s world-champion lure-coursing Pharaoh dogs. 

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Andre has been around Machine Learning and AI since 1994, on the early days of Artificial Neural Networks. He has developed and deployed an array of ML/AI solutions over the years, that range from cranio-facial identification to more normal ones as, speech and pattern recognition, anomaly detection, failure prediction and forecasts. Today, Andre leads a highly skilled team of Cloud Solutions Architect at Microsoft enabling customers to be successful on Azure.

The episode also features a pair of PSAs from two of our favorite kid-focused technology organizations MakeCode and Kodable.  Give ’em some love (they do a great job!)

PLEASE VISIT http://azureability.com for show notes and additional episodes.  Also, if you like (or even hate!) what we’re doing, please take the time to share your comments and suggestions either by the Podbean App (see links, below), email (lberman@microsoft.com) or Twitter (@azureability). 

CREDITS: Louis Berman (Host); Andre Magni (Guest); Gretchen Huebner (Kodable PSA), Simon Hillvo (MakeCode PSA); Vincent Tone / PremiumBeat (Music); Heather Walsh (Intro/Outro); Louis Berman (Engineer); East Coast Studio (Editing)

TRANSCRIPThttps://www.videoindexer.ai/accounts/1c5a0342-11e8-4e1d-b656-d0bf35b80614/videos/f26d8e3451.

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Koza’s Ant (A Modern Take on the Canonical Genetic Programming Problem)

Koza's Ant EvolverWe’ve all had those less-than-notable-at-the-time yet ultra-significant inflections in our world view that in later days loom large.

I had one of those “moments” in 1993, on an otherwise ordinary fall day when I’d squired my not-yet wife to an unmemorable building on the Northwestern campus, in Chicago.  Marie is a Set and Costume Designer so I have to imagine that we were there for some sort of rehearsal, or maybe a design meeting; something about Orpheus Descending at the Chicago Lyric Opera teases at my memory, although given the remove of 22 years the details have faded.

One thing I vividly remember, though, is reading Steven Levy’s “Artificial Life:  A Report from the Frontier Where Computers Meet Biology;” a book I picked up at the campus bookstore while waiting for Marie to finish whatever she was doing.  She must have been at it for hours because I managed to gulp down something like half of the thickish volume before she emerged from the building.

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An Open Letter to Nick Bostrom

Nick:

Let me start by complimenting you on a bravura performance.  I’ve read dozens of books and articles on ASI but Superintelligence is clearly in a category of its own.  I have no doubt that your work will stand as the definitive reference in the field for some time to come.

On the other hand, I do have a significant objection; if only to the work as a whole.  You make a compelling case for working together to mitigate the unprecedented peril of ASI—a sorely needed case, truth be told!—but I can’t help but think that, even so, your book is suffused with too much optimism.  To resort to bad haiku:

Fearsome ASIs
Can undoubtedly be tamed
We will make them safe!

At the risk of being a Cassandra, I fear that such optimism is entirely wrong!

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